The Longest Night of the Year

Hey, Winter Lovers!

The winter season is certainly in full swing at this point. In fact, today marks the middle of the season. Today is the Winter Solstice. Located on the opposite side of the year from the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, the Winter Solstice is the day with the least amount of daylight.
The shortest day of the year.A magical day of the year, the Winter Solstice reminds us of how harsh and unforgiving mother nature can be. Especially in locations up north—like us at Everything Summer Camp in Northern Wisconsin—Winter Solstices are always cold, dark, and typically covered in ice and snow.

This day would strike fear into the hearts of our ancient ancestors and, without the science that we have today to explain the natural phenomenon of the Winter Solstice, they grew more and more worried in the days leading up to the Solstice that the sun would grow more and more distant until one day they would find that it disappeared completely!

Of course, today we understand this is simply the cycle of the seasons, but back then, it was something to really be scared about. And under such terrifying concern, people brought evergreens and palm trees (depending on their geographic location) into their homes—considering them good luck charms in this relentless season since they never lost their healthy, green color.

Christmas trees and the spirit of the holidays altogether mean gathering with those we hold closest to our hearts to prove that even through the thick of these long, cold, dark winter nights, we can make them feel like the warmest and the brightest of the year.

And when we all treat one another with peace and good will, the idea that these cold, dark nights can also be the warmest and the brightest becomes fact. It’s a beautiful thing that happens every year. Enjoy staying warm on this Winter SVery beautiful, this dim-lit day is always so pretty.olstice night and, as always, thanks for reading.

- John

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